Variants of TREM2 Gene Nearly Triple Risk of Alzheimer’s

A gene so powerful it nearly triples the risk of Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by an international team including researchers from the Mayo Clinic. It is the most potent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's identified in the past 20 years. The findings were reported November 14, 2012 in the online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. The team included researchers from 44 institutions around the world, including 10 from the Mayo Clinic's campuses in Florida and Minnesota. The study was led by John Hardy, Ph.D., a researcher at the Institute of Neurology at University College London and a former professor at Mayo Clinic in Florida. The researchers used new sequencing techniques to home in on the TREM2 gene. Additional TREM2 sequencing was then performed, in part, by scientist Dr. Aleksandra Wojtas in the Mayo Clinic in Florida laboratory of Rosa Rademaker, Ph.D. These studies led to identification of a set of rare variants in TREM2 that occurred more often in 1,092 Alzheimer's disease patients than in a control group of 1,107 healthy people. The most common variant, R47H, was then evaluated in follow-up studies of a large number of Alzheimer's disease patients and controls. Minerva Carrasquillo, Ph.D., a scientist in the Mayo Clinic in Florida laboratory of Steven Younkin, M.D., Ph.D., spearheaded the direct genotyping and analysis of R47H in DNA samples from 1,994 Alzheimer's disease patients and 4,062 "control" participants — individuals verified not to have Alzheimer's. The patients and control participants were evaluated by Mayo Clinic physicians, led by co-authorsDennis Dickson, M.D., Neill Graff-Radford, M.D., and Ronald Petersen, M.D., Ph.D.
Login Or Register To Read Full Story