Telomerase Inhibitor Proves to Be Key Tumor Suppressor

It's been nearly 10 years since Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) scientists Dr. Kun Ping Lu and Dr. Xiao Zhen Zhou discovered PinX1, the first potent endogenous protein shown to inhibit telomerase in mammals. Now the scientific team has discovered a vitally important new function for this telomerase inhibitor. The investigators report online on March 23, 2011, in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) that low levels of PinX1 contribute to cancer development, providing the first genetic evidence linking telomerase activation to chromosome instability and cancer initiation, and suggesting a new avenue of treatment for cancers. "Although telomerase is activated in 85 to 90 percent of human cancers, little has been known about the significance of telomerase activation in chromosome instability and cancer initiation," explains Dr. Lu, the paper's senior author and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. "We have discovered, for the first time, a novel role for abnormal telomerase activation in cancer initiation. This suggests that telomerase inhibition using PinX1 or other small molecules may be used to treat certain cancers with activated telomerase." Of particular note, the group's discovery that most PinX1-mutant mouse tumors share tissues of origin with human cancer types linked to genetic alterations in chromosome 8p23 suggests a possible role for deregulation of the PinX1-telomerase complex for the treatment of several common carcinomas, including breast, lung, liver, and gastrointestinal cancers. Telomeres cap the ends of linear chromosomes and are essential for maintaining chromosome stability. In the majority of human cells, telomeres are slightly shortened each time a cell divides, a process that, over time, leads to cell death.
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