Revolutionary Technique Allows Imaging of All Cells in Entire Regions of Living Brain

Until now, existing microscopy methods to explore living brain tissue have been limited to imaging previously labeled cells only. Yet, owing to technical limitations, not all the cells in a specific region of the brain can be labeled simultaneously, and this has restricted the way we see, and therefore understand, how brain cells, which are highly interconnected, are organized and interact with each other. Dr. Jan Tønnesen, researcher in the Ramón y Cajal Programme at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country’s Department of Neurosciences, and who works at the ACHUCARRO Centre (Achucarro Basque Center for Neuroscience) located in the Basque town of Leioa, is one of the authors of a piece of work published in the February 22, 2018 issue of Cell. The open-access article describes a new microscopy technique known as SUSHI designed to improve the imaging of cells in living brain tissue. The article is titled “Super-Resolution Imaging of the Extracellular Space in Living Brain Tissue.” The new SUSHI (Super-resolution Shadow Imaging) technique allows the tiny space full of liquid surrounding brain cells to be labeled in one sweep, thus obviating the need to individually label all the cells that one is intending to analyze. Given that this "label" also remains outside the cells, a kind of negative image akin to the film used in old cameras is produced. So, the negative image contains the same information about the brain cells as its corresponding positive image, but, thanks to the fact that the labeling procedure is more straightforward, it is much easier to obtain this image and all the information contained in it.
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