Plant Breakthrogh: Auxin Sensing and Signaling Complex Discovered on Plant Cell Surface

Auxin, a small molecule, is a plant hormone discovered by Charles Darwin about 100 years ago. Over the years that followed it became understood to be the most important and versatile plant hormone controlling nearly all aspects of plant growth and development, such as bending of shoots toward the source of light (as discovered by Darwin), formation of new leaves, flowers, and roots, growth of roots, and gravity-oriented growth. Just how a small molecule like auxin could play such a pivotal role in plants baffled plant biologists for decades. Then, about ten years ago, an auxin sensing and signaling system was discovered in the cell's nucleus, but it still could not explain all the diverse roles of auxin. Now, plant cell biologists at the University of California (UC), Riverside, have discovered a new auxin sensing and signaling complex, one that is localized on the cell surface rather than in the cell's nucleus. The discovery provides new insights into the mode of auxin action, the researchers say. "This is a new milestone in auxin biology and will ignite interest in the field," said Dr. Zhenbiao Yang, a professor of cell biology in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, and the leader of the research project. "Our findings conclusively demonstrate the existence of an extracellular auxin sensing system in plants, which had long been proposed but remained elusive. Further, we have uncovered the decades-long mystery of how ABP1, an auxin-binding protein, works to control plant developmental processes." ABP1 was identified more than 40 years ago, but its role was hotly debated among plant biologists because its mode of action remained unclear — until the recent discovery by Yang's team.
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