Low Levels of Vasopressin Hormone in Cerebrospinal Fluid Possible Biomarker for Low Sociability Seen in Autism Spectrum Disorder

One of the characteristics of children with autism spectrum disorder is reduced social ability. It's difficult to study the possible causes of social impairment in children, but a new study shows that rhesus macaques with low sociability also had low levels of the peptide vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid, as did children with autism spectrum disorder. The study, by researchers at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) at the University of California (UC), Davis and Stanford University, was published online on May 2, 2018 in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The article is titled “Arginine Vasopressin in Cerebrospinal Fluid Is a Marker of Sociality in Nonhuman Primates.” "At this point, we consider vasopressin concentrations to be a biomarker for low sociability," said John Capitanio, PhD, Professor of Psychology at UC Davis and a research scientist at the CNPRC. Dr. Capitanio studies the interplay between social behavior and health. Over several years, his team has assessed rhesus macaque monkeys born at the Center for sociability. The Center maintains large field corrals where the macaques live in extended large family groups with the same hierarchies and social behavior that they show in the wild.nAbout fifteen percent of the animals are classed as "low social": they spend less time interacting with others than most macaques. Dr. Capitanio has previously studied how this natural variation affects the course of infectious disease. Professor Karen Parker at the Stanford Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, principal investigator on the project, is interested in why children with autism spectrum disorder have deficits in social ability.
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