High Circulating Levels of Four Specific Proteins Seem to Offer Protection Against Type 1 Diabetes

Patients with type 1 diabetes have significantly lower blood levels of four proteins that help protect their tissue from attack by their immune system, scientists report. Conversely, the patients’ first-degree relatives, who share some of the high-risk genes but do not have the disease, have high levels of these proteins circulating in their blood, said Dr. Jin-Xiong She, Director of the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) at Georgia Regents University. Healthy individuals without the risky genes also have higher levels of the four proteins, IL8, IL-1Ra, MCP-1, and MIP-1β, according to the study published online on July 9, 2015 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The article is titled “Large-Scale Discovery and Validation Studies Demonstrate Significant Reductions in Circulating Levels of IL8, IL-1Ra, MCP-1, and MIP-1 in Type-1 Diabetes Patients.” The findings point toward a sort of protein cocktail that could help at-risk children avoid disease development, as well as new biomarkers in the blood that could aid disease diagnosis, prognosis, and management, said Dr. She, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Genomic Medicine and the study's corresponding author. The scientists looked at a total of 13 cytokines and chemokines, which are cell signaling molecules involved in regulating the immune response. They first looked at blood samples from 697 children with type 1 diabetes and from 681 individuals without antibodies to insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, a hallmark of this generarally autoimmune disease. The scientists then analyzed the blood of a second and larger set of individuals, which included 1,553 children with type 1 diabetes and 1,493 individuals without any sign of anti-beta-cell antibodies.
Login Or Register To Read Full Story