Gladstone Study Reveals How to Reprogram Cells in Our Immune System; Discovery Could Improve Treatments for Autoimmune Diseases and Cancer

When the immune system is imbalanced, either due to overly-active cells or cells that suppress its function, it causes a wide range of diseases, from psoriasis to cancer. By manipulating the function of certain immune cells, called T cells, researchers could help restore the system's balance and create new treatments to target these diseases. Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco revealed, for the first time, a method to reprogram specific T cells. More precisely, they discovered how to turn pro-inflammatory cells that boost the immune system into anti-inflammatory cells that suppress it, and vice versa. The researchers studied two types of cells called effector T cells, which activate the immune system to defend our body against different pathogens, and regulatory T cells, which help control the immune system and prevent it from attacking healthy parts of its environment. "Our findings could have a significant impact on the treatment of autoimmune diseases, as well as on stem cell and immuno-oncology therapies," said Gladstone Senior Investigator Sheng Ding, PhD, who is also a Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco.
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