BRAF-Inhibitor Shows Promise in Treatment of Some Metastatic Melanomas

An international team of researchers from the United States and Australia, including researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, have found that the oral BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib (PLX4032) when tested in a phase II clinical trial offered a high rate of response in patients with previously treated metastatic melanoma and who had the BRAF mutation. More than 50 percent of the patients in the trial had positive, prolonged responses and a median survival of almost 16 months. The study was published in the February 23, 2012 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. According to study co-author Jeffrey S. Weber, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center at Moffitt, approximately 50 percent of melanomas harbor the activating (V600) mutation threonine protein kinase B-RAF. Unfortunately, treatment options for these patients are "limited." The BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib had been found effective in phase I and phase III trials. However, to determine the overall response rate in previously treated stage IV melanoma patients, the researchers designed a multi-center, phase II trial with 132 patients with previously treated BRAF V600-mutant metastatic melanoma. The trial was designed by senior academic authors and representatives of the trial sponsor, Hoffman-La Roche, and was open to adults over the age of 18 with histologically proven stage IV melanoma, progressive disease, and at least one prior systemic treatment. "Few patients with metastatic melanoma bearing the BRAF V600 mutation have a response to systemic chemotherapies," said Dr. Weber. "Additionally, most have a median survival of only 6 to 10 months.
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