ASEMV 2019 Annual Meeting on Exosomes & Microvesicles Opened Sunday Evening, October 6, at Asilomar in Pacific Grove, California

The 2019 annual meeting of the American Society for Exosomes and Microvesicles (ASEMV) was held October 6-10 at the gorgeous Asilomar Conference Grounds in Pacific Grove, California, home of migrating monarch butterflies, steps from the Pacific Ocean, and just 120 miles south of San Francisco. The glorious natural setting was almost matched perhaps by the broad range of 60 scintillating presentations delivered by scientists from around the country and world, during the five intense days of meetings focused on one of the most exciting aspects of biology and mediicine. This year’s meeting, organized as always by Stephen Gould, PhD, of Johns Hopkins, began on Sunday evening with a brief introduction on the history of the ASEMV annual meetings by Michael Graner, PhD, University of Colorado-Denver, and this was followed by the keynote presentation, sponsored by Caris Life Sciences, and delivered by Dr. Travis Thomson of the University of Massachusetts (Worcester, MA). Dr. Thomson’s address was titled “Arc and Copia in Exosome-Mediated Information Exchange.” Dr. Thomson described Arc as a “master regulator of neuronal plasticity and as a remnant of a transposon gag region of a virus. In a 2018 article in Cell (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29328915), Dr. Thomson and colleagues noted that Arc/Arg3.1 is required for synaptic plasticity and cognition, and mutations in this gene are linked to autism and schizophrenia. Arc bears a domain resembling retroviral/retrotransposon Gag-like proteins, which multimerize into a capsid that packages viral RNA. The significance of such a domain in a plasticity molecule is uncertain.
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