Additional Drug Reduces Lesions in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

An international team of researchers has found that adding a humanized monoclonal antibody called daclizumab to standard treatment reduces the number of new or enlarged brain lesions in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Daclizumab is specific for CD25, a protein that is expressed on activated T cells, and binding of daclizumab to CD25 results in selective inhibition of these activated T cells. Daclizumab treatment has been studied in patients with human autoimmune conditions, such as MS, that are characterized by abnormal T-cell responses. "Previous research has shown that treatment with daclizumab reduced multiple sclerosis disease activity," said Dr. John W. Rose, professor of neurology at the University of Utah School of Medicine, and senior author on the current article. "Our work in the CHOICE trial [a Phase 2, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study] shows that daclizumab significantly reduces MS lesion formation in people with active relapsing disease." In addition to finding that add-on treatment with high-dose daclizumab resulted in a significantly lower number of new or enlarged MS lesions, the researchers found that patients treated with either high- or low-dose daclizumab had a seven to eight times higher number of immune cells called CD56bright natural killer cells (NK cells). Previous research has shown that untreated MS patients have lower numbers of these NK cells than healthy individuals. "Several lines of evidence point to a potential function for CD56bright natural killer cells in regulating the immune system," explained Dr. Rose.
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